Volume 3, Issue 3, September 2019, Page: 60-65
Assessment of Potential Risk due to Accidental Melting of Scrap Metal Containing Depleted Uranium Using a Computational Method
Elsayeda Farid Salem, Nuclear Law and Nuclear Licensee Department, Egypt Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority, Cairo, Egypt
Mohamed Abdelati, Nuclear Safeguards and Physical Protection Department, Egypt Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority, Cairo, Egypt
Kamel Mohamed El Kourghly, Nuclear Safeguards and Physical Protection Department, Egypt Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority, Cairo, Egypt
Received: Jan. 26, 2019;       Accepted: Apr. 3, 2019;       Published: Oct. 31, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajese.20190303.13      View  18      Downloads  6
Abstract
Depleted uranium (DU) has a beneficial use, such as ballast in aircraft and radiation shielding. Due to the chemical and radiological toxicity it may have adverse consequences to human health, particularly if it enters the body through inhalation, ingestion or wounding. One significant problem area, when working with DU, comes from finely divided airborne particles, which can result from some manufacturing operations such as machining and grinding. In this study RESRAD-Recycle computer code is used to estimate the exposure of workers and public to the recycling of scrap metal including depleted uranium and to evaluate the risk. Two general types of exposure scenarios have been incorporated into RESRAD-Recycle. The First scenario (worker scenario), evaluates worker’s doses during the recycled material process. The second scenario (product scenario), determines public dose and risk from the use or exposure to products made of contaminated scrap metal. The obtained results indicate that the slag worker exposed to the highest dose and risk. In addition, the produced products cause a public hazard. Therefore, strengthen the nuclear safety and security regulations to this material type is mandatory. Spreading safety, security and safeguard culture is requisite to reduce the hazards of the radioactive materials.
Keywords
Depleted Uranium, RESRAD-Recycle Computer Code, Dose, Recycled Radioactive Materials
To cite this article
Elsayeda Farid Salem, Mohamed Abdelati, Kamel Mohamed El Kourghly, Assessment of Potential Risk due to Accidental Melting of Scrap Metal Containing Depleted Uranium Using a Computational Method, American Journal of Environmental Science and Engineering. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2019, pp. 60-65. doi: 10.11648/j.ajese.20190303.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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